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June 2016 Archive

5 Unmissable Yum Cha Dishes

5 Unmissable Yum Cha Dishes
Yum Cha, which literally means Tea Time, traditionally originates in China as a breakfast or morning dining meal.  It involves drinking Chinese tea and eating a range of yum cha dishes. It is a popular style of dining that consists of a wide variety of traditional Chinese dishes. There are often so many dishes that it can be difficult to know where to begin. Here are 5 dishes that are absolutely unmissable when doing Yum Cha.

Prawn Dumpling 
One of the most popular Yum Cha dishes is the prawn dumpling, which consists of shrimp wrapped inside a transparent starchy dumpling. You know the dumpling has been cooked to perfection when the skin is thin and translucent and does not break apart when you pick it up. The best prawn dumplings will also make sure to contain a generous amount of well cooked meat.

Beef Tripe
Beef Tripe is made with the muscular lining of a cow's stomach and has unique texture which is quite different to regular beef meat. Visually it doesn't look too appealing and it may not be everyone's favourite but it is definitely worth a try!

Chicken Feet
This dish is not for the faint of heart, however Chicken Feet are very popular in China, especially among women. They are typically served in a sauce flavoured with black fermented beans, bean paste and sugar. Better sit this one out if you really are easily grossed out but those who brave the gristly crunch are believed to receive serious benefits to their skin, thanks to the collagen in the joints.

Turnip Cake
Turnip cakes consist of shredded radish or daikon combined with plain rice flour and water.  These ingredients are stirred together and poured into a steamer until solidified. The resulting cake is then cut into squares and lightly pan-friend to bring out the flavours, creating a thin crispy layer on the outside with a soft centre. 

Mango Pudding
You really can't finish up a meal without a dessert, and Mango Pudding is definitely one of the best ways to end your meal on a sweet note. Being the most popular dessert served at Yum Cha restaurants, this pudding is made with fresh mangoes, condensed milk, sugar and agar or gelatine. 

These are only a few of the dishes served at Yum Cha, there are plenty more exciting and flavoursome options.  Check out our Chinese spice paste range where we offer a variety of options for you to create for your authentic meal. 


Where to Eat in Singapore with Kids

Where to Eat in Singapore with Kids
A melting pot of sorts, Singapore cuisine is made up of a diverse influence from Malaysia, India, China, and of course, the Brits. There are so many delicious cuisines and dishes to try on your next family trip to Singapore. We know travelling with children can be challenging at times so here are a few of our tips on where to eat in Singapore when you have children, to make your life a little easier.

Hawker Markets
If you are after an authentic Singaporean experience, the Hawker markets are the place to go. This is where the street food carts gather and it will be sure to keep your children amused. The carts themselves were taken off the streets and put altogether to make the entire experience more hygienic.

Each stall is given a license and grading, with A being the best and D being the worst. You can reserve your seat in a hawker by 'chopping' - that is, throwing any object on the chair to claim it - we recommend using a packet of tissues!

This is the place where locals flock to for tasty, cheap and local food. Singapore is on the expensive side of Asian travel so this is a great place to eat in order of reducing your family's overall travel budget. Inexpensive, delicious, safe and entertaining! What more do you need?

Our favourites:
• Stay under the Stars - Boon Tat Street Night Market
• Maxwell Road Hawker Centre

Traditional Singapore Breakfast
On the edge of Chinatown and the Financial District, you can enjoy a colonial-influenced breakfast in one of the oldest cafes in Singapore, Ya Kun Kaya Toast.

It consists of runny eggs and kaya toast with a mug of strong traditional coffee (kopi) sweetened with condensed milk. This is a sweet breakfast sure to appeal to the kids' sweet tooth.

Kaya is a spread made from egg yolk, coconut milk, and brown sugar. The hot tip is to add some sweet soy sauce and pepper to your eggs, mix it together and dip your toast in.

Our favourites:
• Ya Kun Kaya Toast
• Tong Ah Eating House
• Killiney Kopitiam

Chilli Crab
We highly recommended chilli crab! It comes in a pot of thick, chilli sauce made from tomato puree, ketchup, sambal, and a variety of spices and sauces.

Grab your apron and gloves and get messy! The children are sure to love getting their hands dirty whilst eating their dinner!

Our favourites:
• Long Beach Seafood Restaurant: try the crab with some other delicious share plates of bamboo clam, beef in ginger and oyster sauce and fried rice.
• Newton Food Centre: known for their seafood and chilli crab and are a local's favourite too.
 
Zaffron Kitchen
Delicious fusion of Indian and Singaporean cuisine located on East Coast Road in the village of Katong. The restaurant is family friendly with a kid's menu and kids' corner including toys and movies!

Arteastiq Boutique Tea House
Arteastiq Boutique Tea House offers the ideal combination of tea appreciation, cakes and art jamming sessions. It's a perfect spot for the kids to get paint and get creative, so why not go somewhere that will entertain both the adults and the children?  Pop over to the adjacent art jamming studio and watch the kids let out all their energy on painting a masterpiece whilst sipping a cup of tea. You can join in too, don't let them have all the fun! 

Slappy Cakes
Kids love pancakes and making things so this is the perfect spot for children. Slappy Cakes is a one-of-a-kind dining experience where guests can make their own pancakes right at their table! We recommend the buttermilk pancakes with blueberries, pecan nuts, shredded coconut, chopped banana and maple syrup!

If you are not planning a family trip to Singapore soon you can still experience the taste sensations at home! Why not try our Singaporean Chicken Curry and make it with crab instead or to achieve authentic Singaporean rice make our Singaporean Chicken Rice spice paste and serve it with chilli and tamari sauce.


A Guide to Korean Street Foods

A Guide to Korean Street Foods
One of the number one reasons people travel abroad to Seoul, Korea is for its amazing range of food. In particular, Korea's street food are unforgettable and is what makes people want to go back for more. The type of delicacies that are available on the streets of Seoul are for any age from kids to even elder, they are loved dishes that everyone anywhere can enjoy in Korea. We've got your guide to what you should definitely have on your street food check-list when in Korea.

Tteokbokki (Spicy Rice Cakes)
Tteokbokki is rice cakes that are lathered in spicy red pepper paste sauce. It's of a bright red colour which is a clear indication of how spicy it can be (depending on where you go) so be careful if you're not a fan of a fire in your mouth. There are a few variations of Tteobokki where instead of spicy sauce the rice cakes are stir fried in a wok with some oil, topped with red pepper flakes. 

Sundae (Blood Sausage)
Sundae is a common street food in Korea that uses coagulated pigs blood, glass noodles and barley with pig or cow intestines for the sausage skin. At first sight you may be a bit grossed out just from its looks but not to worry, even some Koreans are as well. Another variation of Sundae is where it is stir fried using the same ingredients just fried with vegetables and red pepper paste.

Odeng (Fish Cakes)
Odeng is one of the cheapest street foods you'll find in the streets of Seoul where it costs only about 500won a stick (that's about $0.60AU!). Skewered on a stick and left in a mouth-watering broth, that comes free with any order and can even cure bad hang overs, just put on some sauce and enjoy.

Kkultarae (Dragon Beard Candy)
Dragon Beard Candy, as funny as it sounds, is a royal dessert that was made for the kings. Made with a hard block of honey, powdered up with corn starch and stretched out into super thin strands of stringy sweet snack goodness this is one street food you definitely should try out. 

Hotteok (Pancake)
Hotteok is one of the most famous street foods of Korea. It's a dessert pancake that is put on a griddle and then filled with lots of sweet goodies like brown sugar, honey, pine nuts and cinnamon. It's one of Korea's most representative street snacks and is definitely worth a try. There are many variations of the Hotteok with some being fluffy, creamy or even soft. 

Dalgona (Old-fashion Sugar Candy)
Dalgona doesn't particularly have an English name however it is also another one of Korea's most well-known street food. It's also one of the simplest of Korean street snacks as it's only made with white sugar and baking soda. If you ever go to a stall in Korea you'll find that this street food is also like a game. In the centre of the cookie is usually a shape and the goal of the game is to break the edges around the shape keeping it intact. Usually if you're successful, you get to eat it for free!

If you're craving some Korean delicacy check out our Asian Home Gourmet Korean Range, where you can enjoy authentic Korean dishes right in your home. Check out our Korean Kimchi Soup or Korean Marinade(Bulgogi) and you'll be transported to the streets of Seoul.


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5 Unmissable Yum Cha Dishes

5 Unmissable Yum Cha Dishes

Yum Cha, which literally means Tea Time, traditionally originates in China as a breakfast or morning dining meal. It involves drinking Chinese tea and eating a range of yum cha dishes. It is a popular style of dining that consists of a wide variety of traditional Chinese dishes. There are often so many dishes that it can be difficult to know where to begin. Here are 5 dishes that are absolutely unmissable when doing Yum Cha.

» Read more

Where to Eat in Singapore with Kids

Where to Eat in Singapore with Kids

A melting pot of sorts, Singapore cuisine is made up of a diverse influence from Malaysia, India, China, and of course, the Brits. There are so many delicious cuisines and dishes to try on your next family trip to Singapore. We know travelling with children can be challenging at times so here are a few of our tips on where to eat in Singapore when you have children, to make your life a little easier.

» Read more

A Guide to Korean Street Foods

A Guide to Korean Street Foods

One of the number one reasons people travel abroad to Seoul, Korea is for its amazing range of food. In particular, Korea's street food are unforgettable and is what makes people want to go back for more. The type of delicacies that are available on the streets of Seoul are for any age from kids to even elder, they are loved dishes that everyone anywhere can enjoy in Korea. We've got your guide to what you should definitely have on your street food check-list when in Korea.

» Read more