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Indian Korma

Indian Korma The roots of Korma can be traced back to the Mughali era. It is believed that when the Mughuls moved to Lucnow in the 1700's, traditional Mughali cuisine fused with the creamy sauces often used by the locals, led to the creation of the Korma we know today. The entire region of South Asia including Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan has incorporated the korma curry into their traditional cuisines now.

Like most dishes with a rich heritage, cooking techniques vary over time as methods and secrets are passed down through the generations. Today, Korma is a mild, creamy aromatic base, in which vegetables or meats are simmered.  Cream and coconut milk are the base of the sauce with subtle aromatic spices such as cardamom cloves and cinnamon.  Sometimes  they will even add in a few tomatoes.

Five best kept secrets to give your Korma that star quality it deserves:

  • Both steamed rice or Naan breads are great side to serve with the korma sauce
  • Nuts and other condiments are often toasted and powdered before being added to the sauce, this is predominantly used as a thickening agent
  • The North Indian version uses cardamom and saffron for creating the special aroma
  • Tomatoes are added in the modern day version of the korma recipe
  • Korma sauce can be prepared a few days in advance and stored in the freezer before being used
Not as hot as a Vindaloo, this is a soft, easy eating curry that the whole family can enjoy!   

Indian Korma Curry

Serves 4

•    1 packet Indian Korma Curry Spice Paste
•    1 large onion, finely chopped
•    1 tbsp vegetable oil
•    450 g (1 lb) deboned chicken meat, cut into bite-sized pieces
•    1 cup (220 mL) water
•    2 tbsp cream, coconut cream or yoghurt
•    2 tbsp almond flakes, crushed cashew nuts or fresh coriander as garnish (optional)

  1. Heat oil in non-stick saucepan on medium heat.  Add onion and Spice Paste; stir-fry for 2 minutes.
  2. Add meat; stir-fry for 3 minutes.  Stir in water.  Bring to boil.
  3. Reduce heat, simmer for 15 minutes or until cooked.  Stir occasionally.  Remove from heat and stir in cream or yoghurt.  Garnish.

Cooking tip: You may use beef, lamb, fish, seafood or vegetable instead of chicken. Adjust cooking time accordingly.


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