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July 2013 Archive

Tempura

Tempura

Tempura is a form of deep frying foods in a light batter coating. While Japan is well known for its tempura, the surprising fact is that it did not originate it Japan. It was introduced in the 16th century, by Portuguese missionaries. When it was introduced to Japan, master chefs there elevated the taste and texture of this food to what it is today.

What makes Tempura different from other fried foods is its distinctive batter. Made from beaten egg, flour and ice-cold water, Tempura batter uses no bread crumbs and less oil than other methods of frying. Originally, tempura was a popular food eaten at street vendors and typically included fish and vegetables.

Today, tempura is most often served with rice or on top of soba noodles. It may be served as a side and dipped in sauce. Many other food items including sweets such as ice cream, fruit, and chocolate bars are now also batter-fried in the tempura style.


Try our Tempura dessert recipes:

Tempura Apple Recipe

Banana Fritters Recipe

 

Szechuan Cuisine

Szechuan Cuisine

Szechuan cuisine is a style of Chinese cuisine originating from the Sichuan province in south west China. Known as Chuan Cai in Chinese, Szechuan cuisine can be traced back more than 2,000years, although it's recognition as a distinct regional cuisine took place about 800 years ago during the Southern Song Dynasty

Szechuan cuisine enjoys an international reputation for being spicy and flavourful resulting from liberal use of garlic and chilli, as well as the unique flavour of the Sichuan pepper. Peanuts, sesame paste, and ginger are also prominent ingredients in Szechuan cooking. Common preparation techniques include stir frying, steaming and braising.

Statistics show that the number of Sichuan dishes has surpassed 5,000. Dishes typical of Sichuan are twice cooked pork, fish-flavoured pork shred, Zhang Tea Duck, and Ma Po Tofu.

Try this recipe for Szechuan Stir Fried Chicken, a meal that the whole family can enjoy!


SZECHUAN STIR FRIED CHICKEN WITH RICE

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 10 minutes

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

1 packet Asian Home Gourmet Spice Paste for Szechuan Kung Pao Stir Fry

2 tsp oil

250 g minced chicken meat

1 (110 g) medium onion, sliced

Egg solution (2 whole eggs with 2 Tbsp water)

5 pcs mushroom, strips

5 pcs prawns, shelled and deveined

500 g cooked rice

2 Tbsp tomato sauce

2 Tbsp oyster sauce

1 Tbsp thick soy sauce

Spring onion as garnish

 

Cooking Method:

  1. Heat oil in a large non-stick frying pan.
  2. Stir fry the onion for 1 minute. Add in chicken, prawns, mushrooms, Spice Paste and all sauces. Mix well and stir fry until chicken turns brown.
  3. Add in cooked rice. Stir constantly to prevent rice from sticking onto the pan.
  4. In a separate pan, spread a thin layer of egg solution on hot frying pan.
  5. After the egg is cooked, remove and put on a plate. Place the fried rice on top and fold in the four sides of the egg.

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Indian Korma

Indian Korma The roots of Korma can be traced back to the Mughali era. It is believed that when the Mughuls moved to Lucnow in the 1700's, traditional Mughali cuisine fused with the creamy sauces often used by the locals, led to the creation of the Korma we know today. The entire region of South Asia including Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan has incorporated the korma curry into their traditional cuisines now.

Like most dishes with a rich heritage, cooking techniques vary over time as methods and secrets are passed down through the generations. Today, Korma is a mild, creamy aromatic base, in which vegetables or meats are simmered.  Cream and coconut milk are the base of the sauce with subtle aromatic spices such as cardamom cloves and cinnamon.  Sometimes  they will even add in a few tomatoes.

Five best kept secrets to give your Korma that star quality it deserves:

  • Both steamed rice or Naan breads are great side to serve with the korma sauce
  • Nuts and other condiments are often toasted and powdered before being added to the sauce, this is predominantly used as a thickening agent
  • The North Indian version uses cardamom and saffron for creating the special aroma
  • Tomatoes are added in the modern day version of the korma recipe
  • Korma sauce can be prepared a few days in advance and stored in the freezer before being used
Not as hot as a Vindaloo, this is a soft, easy eating curry that the whole family can enjoy!   

Indian Korma Curry

Serves 4

•    1 packet Indian Korma Curry Spice Paste
•    1 large onion, finely chopped
•    1 tbsp vegetable oil
•    450 g (1 lb) deboned chicken meat, cut into bite-sized pieces
•    1 cup (220 mL) water
•    2 tbsp cream, coconut cream or yoghurt
•    2 tbsp almond flakes, crushed cashew nuts or fresh coriander as garnish (optional)

  1. Heat oil in non-stick saucepan on medium heat.  Add onion and Spice Paste; stir-fry for 2 minutes.
  2. Add meat; stir-fry for 3 minutes.  Stir in water.  Bring to boil.
  3. Reduce heat, simmer for 15 minutes or until cooked.  Stir occasionally.  Remove from heat and stir in cream or yoghurt.  Garnish.

Cooking tip: You may use beef, lamb, fish, seafood or vegetable instead of chicken. Adjust cooking time accordingly.


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Tempura

Tempura

Tempura is a form of deep frying foods in a light batter coating. While Japan is well known for its tempura, the surprising fact is that it did not originate it Japan. It was introduced in the 16th century, by Portuguese missionaries. When it was introduced to Japan, master chefs there elevated the taste and texture of this food to what it is today.

» Read more

Szechuan Cuisine

Szechuan Cuisine

Szechuan cuisine is a style of Chinese cuisine originating from the Sichuan province in south west China. Known as Chuan Cai in Chinese, Szechuan cuisine can be traced back more than 2,000years, although it's recognition as a distinct regional...

» Read more

Indian Korma

Indian Korma

The roots of Korma can be traced back to the Mughali era. Like most dishes with a rich heritage, cooking techniques vary over time as methods and secrets are passed down through the generations. Today, Korma is a mild, creamy aromatic base, in which vegetables or meats are simmered. Cream and coconut milk are the base of the sauce with subtle aromatic spices such as cardamom cloves and cinnamon.

» Read more