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Japanese Miso Soup

Japanese Miso Soup Each region of Japan has its own type of miso according to the area's climate and eating customs. The three main types of Miso soup can be best identified by their difference in colour. Shiromiso is a white miso made from rice native to Kyoto, hatchomiso , a sweet soybean miso particular to Aichi Prefecture, and Shinshu, the most widely eaten miso, is a salty, red-coloured paste, produced chiefly in Nagano Prefecture.

Miso Soup is not only deliciously tasty, but it also contains various health benefits. As they say in Japan, a bowl of miso a day keeps the doctor away! Vitamin E, daisein, saponin and the brown pigment contained in miso act as anti-oxidants. Miso is also a source of dietary fibre, which cleans your intestines and is good for your bowel and this is just to name a few.

Miso soup is quick and easy to cook with Asian Home Gourmet's Japanese miso spice paste sachet. Here are some secrets behind the simplicity, just as with cooking other Japanese dishes:
•         Avoid leaving miso soup overnight, because "fresh" miso soup is definitely the best
•         Make sure to serve miso soup hot
•         If the package has not been opened, miso can be preserved at room temperature
•         Once you use miso, keep it in a refrigerator and seal the package with plastic wrap


Miso Soup

Serves 4

·         1 packet Japanese Miso Spice Paste

·         150 g (5.25 oz) silken tofu; cut into small cubes

·         500 mL - 605 mL)  (2½  - 2¾ cups ) water or unsalted chicken stock

·         Fresh spring onions, chopped as garnish

 

1.     Mix Spice Paste and water in a saucepan.

2.     Bring the mixture to boil.  Stir occasionally.

3.     Add tofu and cook for 1 minute.  Garnish.

 

Cooking tips:

(a)   Meat or seafood may be used instead of tofu.  Adjust cooking time accordingly.

(b)   Miso Stir-Fried Seafood/Meat

Heat 1 tbsp oil in non-stick pan.  Add 550 g (2¼ lb) seafood (scallops or prawns) or sliced chicken meat; stir-fry for 5 minutes.  Add Spice Paste and 100 g (3.5 oz) vegetables (onion or carrots), stir-fry until cooked.


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Japanese Miso Soup

Japanese Miso Soup

Each region of Japan has its own type of miso according to the area's climate and eating customs. The three main types of Miso soup can be best identified by their difference in colour. Shiromiso is a white miso made from rice native to Kyoto, hatchomiso , a sweet soybean miso particular to Aichi Prefecture, and Shinshu, the most widely eaten miso, is a salty, red-coloured paste, produced chiefly in Nagano Prefecture.

» Read more