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May 2013 Archive

Japanese Miso Soup

Japanese Miso Soup Each region of Japan has its own type of miso according to the area's climate and eating customs. The three main types of Miso soup can be best identified by their difference in colour. Shiromiso is a white miso made from rice native to Kyoto, hatchomiso , a sweet soybean miso particular to Aichi Prefecture, and Shinshu, the most widely eaten miso, is a salty, red-coloured paste, produced chiefly in Nagano Prefecture.

Miso Soup is not only deliciously tasty, but it also contains various health benefits. As they say in Japan, a bowl of miso a day keeps the doctor away! Vitamin E, daisein, saponin and the brown pigment contained in miso act as anti-oxidants. Miso is also a source of dietary fibre, which cleans your intestines and is good for your bowel and this is just to name a few.

Miso soup is quick and easy to cook with Asian Home Gourmet's Japanese miso spice paste sachet. Here are some secrets behind the simplicity, just as with cooking other Japanese dishes:
•         Avoid leaving miso soup overnight, because "fresh" miso soup is definitely the best
•         Make sure to serve miso soup hot
•         If the package has not been opened, miso can be preserved at room temperature
•         Once you use miso, keep it in a refrigerator and seal the package with plastic wrap


Miso Soup

Serves 4

·         1 packet Japanese Miso Spice Paste

·         150 g (5.25 oz) silken tofu; cut into small cubes

·         500 mL - 605 mL)  (2½  - 2¾ cups ) water or unsalted chicken stock

·         Fresh spring onions, chopped as garnish

 

1.     Mix Spice Paste and water in a saucepan.

2.     Bring the mixture to boil.  Stir occasionally.

3.     Add tofu and cook for 1 minute.  Garnish.

 

Cooking tips:

(a)   Meat or seafood may be used instead of tofu.  Adjust cooking time accordingly.

(b)   Miso Stir-Fried Seafood/Meat

Heat 1 tbsp oil in non-stick pan.  Add 550 g (2¼ lb) seafood (scallops or prawns) or sliced chicken meat; stir-fry for 5 minutes.  Add Spice Paste and 100 g (3.5 oz) vegetables (onion or carrots), stir-fry until cooked.


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Thai Green Curry

Thai Green Curry Thai curries are often identified by their brazen colours, and green curry is no different. Green chillies, shallots and kaffir lime leaves are just some of the ingredients that lend the dish its hue but its many other elements, including fish sauce, shrimp paste and cumin means that no true Thai green curry is a bright green. Rather, it's a greenish beige.

While many new chefs believe the secret to making the most delicious and authentic curry lies in creating the curry paste from scratch, today spice paste in the supermarket contain natural ingredients.

Famous Thai-American cooking teacher, Kasma Loha-unchit, herself states, "...unless you have all of the fresh herbs and spices required to make authentic and traditional Thai curry pastes, you're better off using commercial curry pastes than trying to make do with ill-advised substitutes".

Supermarket pastes, including Asian Home Gourmet's Thai Green Curry SpicePaste©; are often made in South East Asia using a wide array of ingredients sourced from Thailand that are simply not available in the local market. Even if you are able to get all the ingredients, the supermarket paste is a more affordable option and has had more time to concentrate in flavour.

So trust us here at AHG, where the team all wishes you happy cooking with our very own Thai Green Curry Recipe!

For other great recipe twists and innovative ways to use Asian Home Gourmet's Thai Green Curry SpicePaste©, try these other great recipes: Thai-Style Fish Cakes, Thai Green Curry Mussels and Basil Chicken and Mushroom Stir Fry

Chicken Thai Green Curry
(Serves 4)

Ingredients:
• 1 packet Asian Home Gourmet Thai Green Curry SpicePaste©
• 1 - 2 tbsp vegetable oil
• 1½ cups (330 mL) coconut milk or milk
• 350 g (3/4 lb) boneless chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces
• 100 g (3.5 oz) green peas or aubergines
• Sweet basil leaves, green chilli or coriander as garnish (optional)

Method:
1. Heat oil in non-stick saucepan on medium-low heat. Add Spice Paste and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add half of coconut milk and cook until oil appears on top.
2. Add meat, cook for 5 - 8 minutes or until done.
3. Add balance of coconut milk and green peas or aubergine. Bring to boil. Garnish and serve hot with rice. Cooking tip: Beef, lamb or vegetables may be used instead of chicken.

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Korean Bulgogi

Korean Bulgogi In the world of linguistics, none is a more direct translation than bulgogi. What is it? Barbequed meat. What does it mean? Fire meat.

Bulgogi generally refers to barbequed marinated beef but is available in variations as dwaeji bulgogi (pork) and dak bulgogi (chicken). Usually a prime cut of meat that's cooked over an open fire, bulgogi is sliced and served over rice.  Before cooking, the meat is marinated to enhance its flavour and tenderness with a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, garlic, pepper and other ingredients such as scallions, onions or white button mushrooms.

 Like many traditional dishes, there is no one right way to make bulgogi, and individual Korean cooks may differ in their precise definition of the dish, and in the recipes they use. It has recently become trendy, however, to serve bulgogi in baguettes (a la Jamie Oliver), sushi, spring rolls and ground up as hamburger patty.

So how do you like to eat your bulgogi?



Here's our twist on it!

Click on the picture to view the recipe:
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Japanese Miso Soup

Japanese Miso Soup

Each region of Japan has its own type of miso according to the area's climate and eating customs. The three main types of Miso soup can be best identified by their difference in colour. Shiromiso is a white miso made from rice native to Kyoto, hatchomiso , a sweet soybean miso particular to Aichi Prefecture, and Shinshu, the most widely eaten miso, is a salty, red-coloured paste, produced chiefly in Nagano Prefecture.

» Read more

Thai Green Curry

Thai Green Curry

Thai curries are often identified by their brazen colours, and green curry is no different. Green chillies, shallots and kaffir lime leaves are just some of the ingredients that lend the dish its hue but its many other elements, including fish sauce, shrimp paste and cumin means that no true Thai green curry is a bright green. Rather, it's a greenish beige.

» Read more

Korean Bulgogi

Korean Bulgogi

In the world of linguistics, none is a more direct translation than bulgogi. What is it? Barbequed meat. What does it mean? Fire meat.

» Read more