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Lucky Traditional Chinese New Year Dishes

Lucky Traditional Chinese New Year Dishes
Chinese New Year, also known as the Lunar New Year, falls on the first day of the lunar calendar. Since it is different to the calendar dates we are mostly familiar with, the date for Chinese New Year tends to change every year. This year, it will be celebrated on the 28th of January. 

Considered as a day for family reunions, Chinese New Year is one of the most celebrated festivals for Chinese people. On this day, tables will be filled with special dishes believed to bring about good luck in the coming year. Some of the most common Chinese New Year classics that we are familiar with include rice cakes, dumplings, fish and sweet rice balls. 

Glutinous Rice Cake (Niángāo)
Usually appearing in a yellow or white colour to symbolise wealth, rice cakes are considered the most popular Chinese New Year dessert. Traditionally, it is made from glutinous rice, sugar, Chinese dates and lotus leaves. This particular dish is considered a sign of good luck to the Chinese people because the name of the cake, pronounced as 'nian gao' in Chinese, means "getting higher". To them, it implies prosperity and promotion in the year ahead. 

Dumplings (Shuǐjiǎo)
With a long history tracing back to the Qing Dynasty, the Chinese dumplings have thought to bring about happiness to the Chinese people for centuries. Most commonly made with minced meat and finely chopped Chinese chives wrapped in a doughy skin, it is a traditional dish eaten on Chinese New Year. Shaped like a little pocket and fully filled, it signifies an increase in wealth and treasure. 

Fish (Yú)
For Chinese people, the first meal of the year is not complete without fish on the table whether it is steamed, boiled or braised. Pronounced as 'yu' which sounds like "surplus", Chinese people believe that anything extra is a good thing so that they can make more with it in the next year. According to the Chinese homophonics, different fish also come with different meanings and luck. 

Sweet Rice Balls (Tāngyuán)
Filled with sweet or savory fillings and served with syrup, these little glutinous rice balls are traditionally served at festivals like the Lantern Festival and Chinese New Year. The round shape of the sweet rice balls and the Chinese pronunciation that means "group and round" reminds the Chinese people of reunion and being together with family on this very special day. 
Celebrate Chinese New Year at home and get inspired with our full range of Chinese products.

(Image source: gochengdu.cn)

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